Archive
Tag "airships"
How the Navy Trains Dirigible Pilots (Mar, 1932)

How the Navy Trains Dirigible Pilots

by John L. Coontz

Uncle Sam is the only nation to systematically train pilots for giant military dirigibles like Los Angeles and Akron.

“WHAT on earth are those men doing?” exclaimed a visitor to the Lakehurst, N. J. naval air station, as he watched several groups of men manipulating as many balloons in an open field.

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Small Dirigible TOWS GLIDER (Jan, 1930)

Small Dirigible TOWS GLIDER

TWO unusual glider events took place recently at Akron, Ohio, municipal airport. One, believed to be the first of its kind ever attempted, was the successful towing of a glider by a small dirigible.

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WAR WEAPONS THE UNITED STATES NEEDS (Apr, 1917)

WAR WEAPONS THE UNITED STATES NEEDS

The Brain of the Modern Zeppelin

In the upper photograph is shown in diagrammatic contrast, the new super-Zeppelin car, with its engine and accoutrements. and the tiny boat of the first air dreadnaughts.

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Trip to Europe Made by Air, Rail and Water (Sep, 1934)

Trip to Europe Made by Air, Rail and Water

Crossing the Atlantic ocean by air has been removed from the category of high adventure to a regular form of transpor- tation running on schedule. For the traveler who is in a hurry, one steamship line has established, as a part of its regular service, a trip by air, rail and water which permits the tourist to cover three continents, or about 16,500 miles, in from nineteen to twenty-one days, depending on the speed of the steamer he uses. The three weeks’ trip spanning three continents covers North America, South America and Europe. From Miami the traveler goes by plane to Rio de Janeiro or Pernambuco, then he boards the “Graf Zeppelin” which makes regular trips from Rio de Janeiro to Friedrichshafen, Germany. From Germany the tourist travels by rail to Cherbourg, France, where he boards a liner for the trip to New York.

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HOSPITAL ON AIRSHIP MAY SWEEP PATIENTS ABOVE CLOUDS IN QUEST OF MORE SUNLIGHT (Jul, 1930)

HOSPITAL ON AIRSHIP MAY SWEEP PATIENTS ABOVE CLOUDS IN QUEST OF MORE SUNLIGHT

For persons suffering with tuberculosis, or just from nerves, will physicians soon prescribe a trip to the clouds in a flying clinic instead of a visit to the mountains?

Not long ago Charles L. Julliot, French lawyer, proposed that airplanes or dirigibles transport such patients above the clouds. His suggestion, which America hears was approved by the medical faculties of France, called attention to the fact that high altitude and sunshine produce well-known changes in the blood, in many cases beneficial.

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A Whole Mess of Stuff I Couldn’t Easily Separate (Dec, 1929)

Graphic Section

All the characteristics of a mammoth ocean liner are reproduced in the “Columbus,” the miniature ship shown above. It is 25 feet long and was constructed by a German engineer at a cost of #4000. Top photo shows the model coming into dock under its own power after a practice spin; below it appears a close-up of the ship. It is driven by an electric motor.

Neil Hamilton, movie actor, demonstrates a revolving camera for taking “dizzy” shots in which rooms and people tumble all over the screen.

Novel Automobile Is Driven By a Single Wheel at Rear.

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Crashing a Zeppelin for Fun (May, 1931)

Crashing a Zeppelin for Fun

by DICK COLE

who gives you a look behind the scenes of the most spectacular air thriller ever made.

Jealously guarded secrets of the amazing Zeppelin crash in “Hell’s Angels” now revealed to Dick Cole by Howard Hughes, the producer of this spectacular movie.

“Wasn’t it marvelous! How in the world did they ever take it?”

Such exclamations and questions are heard on every side as a teeming crowd pours forth from a theater after seeing “Hell’s Angels” -—the outstanding aerial war picture of the day. And it is little wonder! For several hours the spectators have been soaring 10,000 feet above the earth in a huge, wartime Zeppelin, or they have been sky-riding in a giant bombing plane.

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HOSPITAL ON AIRSHIP MAY SWEEP PATIENTS ABOVE CLOUDS IN QUEST OF MORE SUNLIGHT (Jul, 1930)

HOSPITAL ON AIRSHIP MAY SWEEP PATIENTS ABOVE CLOUDS IN QUEST OF MORE SUNLIGHT

For persons suffering with tuberculosis, or just from nerves, will physicians soon prescribe a trip to the clouds in a flying clinic instead of a visit to the mountains?

Not long ago Charles L. Julliot, French lawyer, proposed that airplanes or dirigibles transport such patients above the clouds. His suggestion, which America hears was approved by the medical faculties of France, called attention to the fact that high altitude and sunshine produce well-known changes in the blood, in many cases beneficial. Add to this the natural exhilaration of an air trip, he says, and the effect might be even better than that of a mountain vacation (P. S. M., Mar. ’30, p. 34).

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New Midget Scouts of the Air (May, 1930)

“From then on I was too consarned cold to feel anything very much.”
I thought consarned was a typo, but it would have been weird since the correct replacement would have been “consumed by” or “concerned with the”. Turns out it means: confounded; damned.

New Midget Scouts of the Air

by Lieut. RALPH S. BARNABY, U.S.N. First Man to Pilot a Glider from a Dirigible

If scouts were important to old style warfare, they are doubly important to the new warfare of the air. Army and Navy officials have experimented with every possible idea. Only recently they tested the value of gliders for scout work from dirigibles at Lakehurst. Lieut. Barnaby tells here his story of gliding a motorless ship from the dirigible Los Angeles.

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Junior High School Students Build This Model Dirigible (Aug, 1929)

Wow, I think they got ripped off. That’s $9661 in 2011 dollars.

Junior High School Students Build This Model Dirigible

FLYING on a swivel under its own power, this model dirigible shown above was made by members of a class in aeronautics in Hamilton Junior high school, Long Beach, California.

A vacuum cleaner fan and motor were attached to the model and propel it about in a circle at a rapid rate of speed. It was made of wood and metal at a cost of $750 to the school.

The model demonstrates the newly dis- covered principle of aircraft propulsion invented by F. Slade Dale. The rapidly revolving blades of a centrifugal fan whirl the air away from the bow center. This causes a partial lowering of air pressure at the bow and the atmospheric pressure on the rear portions of the ship drive it forward.

The miniature dirigible was built under the supervision of John Hodgson, former engineer and aviator, now an instructor.

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