Archive
Tag "Bell Telphone"
ANNOUNCING A NEW TELETYPEWRITER SERVICE (Feb, 1932)

ANNOUNCING A NEW TELETYPEWRITER SERVICE

The Belt, System offers to the public a new Teletypewriter Service. Any subscriber to this service may be connected, through the teletypewriter “central,” to any other subscriber, whether he be around the corner or across the continent. Subscribers can type back and forth by wire, for short or long periods, just as they now hold conversations by telephone.

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“I WANT A TELEPHONE IN THIS HOUSE!” (Jun, 1938)

“I WANT A TELEPHONE IN THIS HOUSE!”

“Suppose I get sick? After all, I’m only human. And if I do get a touch of colic … or have a nervous breakdown … do you know what’ll bring it on? Worry! Yes, sir, worrying about how long it would take us to get the doctor if anything should happen.

“Or suppose a pipe bursts in the bathroom? Or a burglar comes along? When something like that happens you don’t write a letter, or go after help on horseback. No, sir. You hop to a telephone!

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WHAT IS THE AT&T? (Feb, 1931)

WHAT IS THE AT&T?

All that most people see of the telephone company are a telephone and a few feet of wire.

But through that telephone you can talk with any one of millions of people, all linked together by the web of equipment of the Bell System.

All its efforts are turned constantly to one job—to give better telephone service to an ever-increasing number of people, as cheaply as it possibly can.

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He’s using the telephone that lends an extra hand (Dec, 1954)

He’s using the telephone that lends an extra hand

For people who want to keep both hands free when they telephone, Bell Telephone Laboratories engineers have devised a new telephone with a sensitive microphone in its base.

To use it, simply press a button. The microphone picks up your voice and sends it on its way. Your party’s voice comes to you through a small loudspeaker. Both hands are left free.

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Your handy phones away from home (Jul, 1958)

Your handy phones away from home

Quick, easy way to keep in touch and get things done wherever you are. Convenient public telephones save you time, money and trouble.

A LIGHT IN THE DARK —More and more outdoor telephone booths are being placed at convenient locations and are available for service 24 hours a day. They supplement the hundreds of thousands of public telephones in buildings, stores, hotels, gas stations, airports, railroad stations and bus terminals.

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More Telephone Service for more people (May, 1947)

More Telephone Service for more people

From The 1946 Annual Report of the American Telephone and Telegraph Company.

1. In no year since the telephone was invented was there such a remarkable increase in the amount of telephone service furnished to the American people as in 1946. The net gain in the number of Bell telephones was 3,264,000, or more than twice the gain for any previous year. Additional telephones were installed at a rate averaging more than 25 a minute every working day.

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Courtesy (Nov, 1940)

Courtesy

We want your telephone service to be good and quick and cheap. But there’s more to it than that. We want it to be courteous too.

No matter what the occasion, there’s always time for a cheery “please” and a pleasant word of thanks. That is the Bell System way. It is one of the fine traditions of the telephone business.

BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM

PREPAREDNESS—THE BELL SYSTEM IS PREPARED TO DO ITS PART IN THE NATION’S PROGRAM OF NATIONAL DEFENSE

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“Wow! This job sure keeps me hopping!” (Nov, 1946)

“Wow! This job sure keeps me hopping!”

“BELIEVE me, fitting all the new dial and manual switchboard equipment and long distance facilities into Bell System central offices all around the country is keeping me mighty busy!

“In a single big dial exchange there may be 4,000 miles of wire. I may have to solder 2,500,000 connections before everything’s ready for you to dial a number.

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Now a telephone with a dial that lights up! (Mar, 1955)

Now a telephone with a dial that lights up!

Have you seen the new Bell telephone with a dial that lights up? It’s perfect for bedrooms, sickrooms … or any dimly lit place. Just pick up the handset and the dial is instantly illuminated.

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1 part in 10,000,000,000 (Oct, 1954)

1 part in 10,000,000,000

To make the most of their revolutionary invention, the transistor, Bell Laboratories scientists needed ultra-pure germanium.

The scientists solved their problem by devising a radically new refining process. The germanium it yields may well be the purest commercially produced material on earth.

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