Archive
Tag "dental"
Tobacco Stained Teeth Instantly Whitened New Safe Way (Jun, 1924)

My 10 year old self can just imagine seeing the Blech-o-dent parodies in Mad magazine.

Tobacco Stained Teeth Instantly Whitened New Safe Way

No need now for yellow, discolored, spotted, tobacco-stained teeth. Bleachodent Combination costs just a few cents and removes unsightly stains in three minutes at home. Leaves teeth white, lustrous, clean and flashing. Recommended everywhere as quicker, surer, safer than old-fashioned scouring methods which injured the enamel.

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Squibb Angle Toothbrush (Jun, 1949)

I thought that angled toothbrushes were a more modern invention. The ads when I was a kid always made it seem that way… Imagine, advertisers lying to me!

Squibb Angle Toothbrush

gets at back teeth easily… comfortably

bent like a dentist’s mirror
to reach more places

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Tooth Saver Kit (May, 1968)

Tooth Saver Kit

Your at-home part of Colgate’s National Anti-Cavity School Program.

Proven among millions of school children—now you can give your child Colgate’s cavity-fighting lesson at home.

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“My dentist and my purse suggest the same toothpaste” (Oct, 1932)

“My dentist and my purse suggest the same toothpaste”

“Colgate’s? – Why certainly! Nothing can clean them better. and when there’s anything wrong with your teeth, young lady – you march right down to my office.”

Dad said we had to come down to earth—and meant it — so mother and I started to cut corners. Necessity brought me to my senses — in more ways than one.

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HE FOUND A WAY… Meyer Rhein’s Toothbrush (Nov, 1954)

HE FOUND A WAY… Meyer Rhein’s Toothbrush

By Alfred Lief

TOOTHPICKS, not toothbrushes, were the common means of dental care when Meyer L. Rhein graduated from Union University in 1880 with a degree in medicine. He was strongly interested in oral hygiene. After spending another year at a college of dentistry, he opened an office in New York as a dentist. Convinced that cavities between teeth and in back teeth could be avoided by proper cleansing, Dr. Rhein decided to remedy matters.

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Chopper Checkup At the Zoo (Nov, 1954)

Chopper Checkup At the Zoo

DESPITE the wonderful pain-killing techniques developed recently in the field of dentistry, most people are still frightened to death by the very thought of having their teeth checked. One dentist, however, who is usually more wary of his patients than they are of him is Dr. C. P. Gandal of New York’s Bronx Zoo.

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Comfortable Dentist Chair Minimizes Patient’s Fears (Mar, 1932)

Comfortable Dentist Chair Minimizes Patient’s Fears

NO MATTER how comfortable patients are made to feel, they will always approach a dentist’s office with some trepidation. There is good reason for this, for once in a dentist’s chair, you have to take what comes and you can’t fight back.

Taking account of the patient’s deep-seated fear, dentists are now doing as much as possible to relieve the situation. Their latest efforts have resulted in the creation of a chair which has about every possible comfort for the victims.

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It may not save your money . . . but it may save your teeth (Mar, 1930)

It may not save your money . . . but it may save your teeth

FORHAN’S has always been made with the feeling that people are far more anxious to have a good dentifrice than a cheap one.

In so vital a matter as good teeth, you need all the protection that the finest dentifrice can give.

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Brushing Up With His Invention (Aug, 1941)

Brushing Up With His Invention

DON LEVERIDGE, 22-year-old senior of the University of Chicago, demonstrates his revolving toothbrush, which uses a hand-operated crank as its power source. The young lady is using an ordinary toothbrush which, according to Don, is old-fashioned in the light of his invention. He has already talked 200 of his fellow students into using his type of brush, and has great hopes for marketing it nationally.

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New Tooth-Paste Tubes Are Made of Glass (Oct, 1937)

New Tooth-Paste Tubes Are Made of Glass
Glass containers for tooth paste, recently developed by a German firm as a substitute for conventional metal tubes, have a built-in piston at one end to force the paste out onto the brush. When empty, the containers can be refilled with paste.

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