Archive
Tag "geiger-counter"
NEW ROADS TO URANIUM RICHES (Jan, 1954)

NEW ROADS TO URANIUM RICHES

Uncle Sam is paying fortunes these days for uranium ore, and it’s easy to find, too. What are you waiting for?

By Lester David

ABOUT a year ago, a tall chap from Minneapolis l knocked at the door of the Atomic Energy Commission headquarters in Grand Junction, Col., and asked to see one of the staff scientists. Ushered into the office of Dr. Al Rasor, he said he’d heard a lot about uranium prospecting and would like to try his hand.

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New Optical Radioactivity Detector – GEIGER SCOPE (Nov, 1954)

New Optical Radioactivity Detector – GEIGER SCOPE

Now you can check minerals for uranium with this amazingly sensitive, inexpensive device. For prospectors, engineers, experimenters, gadgeteers, everyone interested in atomic energy. Now being used in atomic energy laboratories and major universities. Indicates radioactive content with sparkles of light. Sturdy, durable, portable as a pocket watch; needs no power source.

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How to PROSPECT for Atomic Minerals (Jul, 1947)

How to PROSPECT for Atomic Minerals

World-wide race for radioactive minerals is on! New deposits in U. S. being found constantly. Thrilling opportunity. Tells how to find URANIUM, THORIUM, CARNOTITE. PITCHBLENDE, etc. All needed in Atomic Research. Full instructions by mail only 25c. Tells . . .

How to Operate GEIGER COUNTER

Be among first to use famous Geiger Counter. Seeks out Radioactive Minerals. Own your own or rent for vacation. New Uranium deposits may be found in any state. Send 25c for instructions now. Supply limited.

OMAHA SCIENTIFIC SUPPLY
3623 Lake St. ,Dept. PS-2, Omaha 3, Nebr.

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Go Dig Yourself a Fortune (Jun, 1955)

If I find the first part anytime soon, I’ll post it. In the mean time if you’re interested, you can read other articles about prospecting and Geiger counters.

Go Dig Yourself a Fortune

Mi’s prospecting expert gives you the lowdown on what to do when you make a lucky strike.

By Harry Kursh

THE last few years have seen the emergence of a new kind of lone adventurer in America, a type that is gradually replacing the old-time prospector with his whiskers, battered hat, pickax and pack burro. The new type is the sparetime prospector, an amateur geologist and enthusiastic “rock hound” who devotes vacations, weekends and every hour he can spare from his regular activities to searching for uranium and precious metals. Naturally, friends and neighbors think he’s a little off his rocker—until he strikes it rich and retires to Florida.

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HOW TO BUILD A GEIGER-MUELLER URANIUM SURVEY METER (Feb, 1949)

HOW TO BUILD A GEIGER-MUELLER URANIUM SURVEY METER

By F. L. Brittin, S.M.,I.R.E.

ANYONE can build and operate this simplified Geiger-Mueller survey meter, which is an instrument for detecting the presence of radiations emanating from radioactive substances such as valuable uranium and radium. Specifically, the Geiger-Mueller tube, which is the most important component of the instrument, detects X-rays, cosmic rays and gamma rays. Beta rays can also be detected by Geiger tubes with very thin cathode walls.

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New Toys for Junior (Jul, 1950)

New Toys for Junior

Atomic Lab Set. shown at the American Toy Fair in New York, has cloud chamber that makes visible the paths taken by speeding alpha particles, a Geiger counter, and a screen that shows the break-up of radio-active material. A. C. Gilbert Co., of New Haven, Conn.

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Atomic Golf Ball (Mar, 1951)

Atomic Golf Ball

IT may not be world-shattering news, but golfers will welcome one of the newest atomic developments once it emerges from the experimental stage. It’s a golf ball that can’t get lost. Minute quantities of radioactive materials are embedded under the cover of the ball so that if you carry a portable Geiger counter, you can locate it even in dense woods. When you’re getting close to the correct location, you’ll know by the signals on your headphones.

Below, Dr. William L. Davidson the inventor lets Lawson Little, famous golf pro, left, hear the tell-tale clicks. At the right, he gives the fairer sex a chance to marvel at modern science.

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BUILD A URANIUM LOCATOR! (Jun, 1950)

BUILD A URANIUM LOCATOR!

GOVERNMENT NEEDS URANIUM!

Valuable undiscovered deposits may be at your finger tips! Find them with a Geiger Counter. Send $1.00 for Big How-To-Build Plan . . . Describes easy, inexpensive construction and operation. No technical experience needed. This little locator may show you the way to wealth. Uranium and other needed metals are being discovered daily!

Send $1.00 Today For Your Big Plan!
LEJAY MANUFACTURING CO.
247 LeJay Bldg., Minneapolis 8. Minnesota

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Radioactive Safety-Control System (Feb, 1954)

This man was later diagnosed with the only known case of wrist cancer.

Radioactive Safety-Control System
Radioactive crystals and Geiger tubes make a punch press at a United Air Lines maintenance base accident proof. Operators of the press wear wristbands containing the “hot” crystals. Three Geiger tubes enclose the punching area. If hands stray into danger, the tubes pick up radiation from the wristbands and instantly halt the machine —even in midstroke. The machine will not run unless the operator wears the bands.

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’49 Uranium Rush (Feb, 1949)

’49 Uranium Rush

PROFESSIONAL and amateur prospectors by the thousands are literally leaving no stone unturned in the great uranium rush of ’49. The ores which yield atomic energy are being sought in every part of North America.

Excited by reports of government rewards, many of the prospectors are wasting their time in localities where uranium of worthwhile quality can hardly be expected to be found, though there is always a chance that someone may upset the convictions of mining engineers by making a “strike” in a new region.

The Atomic Energy Commission wants to see samples of any ores suspected of containing valuable amounts of radioactive materials, but prospectors are urged to make reasonable tests of their samples before submitting them. Misinformed or overly enthusiastic people have submitted hundreds of samples of worthless rocks, including ordinary concrete, to the commission.

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