Archive
Tag "how its made"
Glass — a New Textile (Sep, 1936)

Glass — a New Textile

Glass, the magical material, is playing a new drama with glamour that is more fascinating than the tricks played by that ancient Asiatic magician, Aladdin.

By A. N. MIRZAOFF

WHEN that clever French statesman, Colbert, stole the secrets of Venetian glass makers, to make his France the center of world arts and industries, he little realized that, a couple of centuries later, the gleaming beauty of glass, which was then restricted to the manufacture of goblets and carafes, would be serving a hundred and one purposes in almost every industry to which the 20th Century man is heir.

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Blind Men Make Radios (Oct, 1937)

This reminds me of a crazy Russian film I posted to YouTube a few years ago. It’s all about what appears to be an entire town complete with school, resort and television factory to cater to the blind. It all looks rather futuristic and amazing and has the feel of propaganda but I have no idea what it says because the entire film is narrated in French.

Blind Men Make Radios

THE world’s most unusual radio factory is in operation in New York City where 304 blind men build radio sets on a production scale. Every operation is performed by them, even to soldering, and it seems that these men make fewer mistakes and do a better job than workers not handicapped with a loss of sight.

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THE MANUFACTURE OF FINE MIRRORS (Jun, 1917)

THE MANUFACTURE OF FINE MIRRORS

A Trade That Is Near to an Art When milady stops before the crystal of her dresser, she doubtless does not realize the time, patience, and skill that has been put into the manufacture of this perfect image-maker.

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WHOLE FORESTS TURNED INTO MATCHES (Feb, 1909)

WHOLE FORESTS TURNED INTO MATCHES

By JAMES COOKE MILLS

HE quantity of matchwood used every day for lighting is enormous and the figures representing the total are almost beyond belief. An expert in forestry has just determined after careful computation that the civilized nations of the world strike three million matches every minute of the twenty-four hours.

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Thousands of Pills for Human Ills Turned Out Each Minute by Whirling Machines (Jul, 1931)

I’m going to go out on a limb and say that all the poison ivy and bee’s stingers went into the homeopathic pills, even though the author thinks the only difference is in how hard the pills are.

Thousands of Pills for Human Ills Turned Out Each Minute by Whirling Machines

WHERE do the pills that you take for a headache or a stomach pain come from? The pictures on this page, made especially for Popular Science Monthly in a New York City pill factory, tell the story of how raw drugs are turned into finished pellets for human consumption.

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750 Million Lumps of Sugar Every Day (Mar, 1950)

750 Million Lumps of Sugar Every Day

By Andrew R. Boone

THE drawing here and the photographs on the next three pages tell the story behind the lump of sugar you dropped into your coffee this morning. They show how the world’s largest cane-sugar refinery turns brownish, gummy raw sugar into sparkling, crystalline grains and cubes.

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How Machines Make Magic Carpets from Oil and Cork (Mar, 1922)

How Machines Make Magic Carpets from Oil and Cork

A HALF a century ago a young inventor noticed that the film on a can of paint was tough. He exposed linseed oil to the air, oxidizing it, then mixed in cork and gum, and produced a substance that could be rolled out, like a pie-crust, into a carpet. Today linoleum, which he thus originated, is manufactured by the machinery pictured on this page.

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MAGIC OF NEON SIGN MAKING SHOWN IN PICTURES (Aug, 1931)

MAGIC OF NEON SIGN MAKING SHOWN IN PICTURES

HOW NEON LIGHTS ARE MADE. The story of the strange new light, invented by Georges Claude, French engineer, told in photos.

FIRST STEP IN MAKING A NEON SIGN. An artist draws a design which includes lettering and decoration, and this design is then enlarged to desired size so tubes can be right dimensions.

SHAPING THE HOT TUBES. With the artist’s design laid upon sheet asbestos, the tubes for the neon sign are heated and then quickly laid in place upon the design and bent to fit it.

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ROPE MAKERS OF SPAIN TWIST STRANDS BY HAND (Dec, 1933)

It’s kind of crazy to contrast this with the way modern rope is made (video).

ROPE MAKERS OF SPAIN TWIST STRANDS BY HAND

In surroundings that suggest a buried city, its telegraph poles half-covered by sand, native rope makers of Palma, Spain, ply their ancient craft. Actually the “telegraph poles” are frames that support the hemp yarn as it is spun. To do this, one man fastens a bundle of hemp fiber around his waist, attaches one -end to a hand wheel, and slowly walks away, paying out the yarn with his hands. Meanwhile an assistant turns the wheel to twist the yarn into a compact strand. When several such strands have been spun, these in turn are twisted together to form a rope.

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Beds From Rubber Bubbles (May, 1950)

Beds From Rubber Bubbles

EVER dreamed of sleeping on a bed of angel food cake?

Well, foam-rubber mattresses are made at U. S. Rubber Company’s Mishawaka, Ind. plant like your ole mammy used to bake that lightweight delicacy.

Just as she whipped up the ingredients, poured the batter into the pan and placed it in the oven, so the pure milk of the rubber tree is mixed with chemicals, whipped into a fluffy foam and then poured into a two-piece mold to be vulcanized into permanent form.

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