Archive
Tag "lighting"
Germ-Killing Lights for Safer Surgery (Sep, 1936)

Germ-Killing Lights for Safer Surgery

Bacteria destroying lamps for the operating room were recently demonstrated to the American Society of Surgeons. The lamp (below) sends out ultra-violet rays which have the property of killing germs in 60 seconds, yet not harming the patient.

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Invisible Rays in Blackout Plant Make Dials Glow (Aug, 1941)

It’s odd how dispassionate this article is considering it’s about Germany and WWII is in full swing although it’s four months before the U.S. enters. Once we joined the war you’d expect to read about how the evil Huns are painting their death gauges using glow-in-the-dark unicorn tears that are only produced by eating French babies.

Invisible Rays in Blackout Plant Make Dials Glow

GHOST LIGHTS shine in German power plants during air raids, but there is no stray gleam from the plant windows. To accomplish this, vital gauges, levers, switches, control wheels, stairs, ladders, and walkways within the plants are painted with chemicals which glow only when illuminated with the invisible rays from special lamps.

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BURGESS Flashlight BATTERIES (Nov, 1954)

Remember, the Tommy gun and dynamite will do you no good if the old wizard catches you in his Burgess beam.

BURGESS Flashlight BATTERIES

“CURSES, ANUDDER GUY , WIT’ BURGESS BATTERIES!!!”

A QUALITY DRY BATTERY FOR EVERY PURPOSE

SEALED IN STEEL AND PLASTIC.

Ask for them at your favorite store.

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Turn on the Windows-It’s Getting Dark (Jan, 1958)

Turn on the Windows-It’s Getting Dark

Homes of the future may have windows that provide light at night as well as during the day. Westinghouse scientists are experimenting with a transparent phosphor placed between two sheets of glass and having an electrical conducting charge. This allows the window to be used in the customary manner, but at night electricity is turned on and the transparent phosphors emit light. The process, called electroluminescence, also can be applied to glass ceilings, coffee-table tops, murals and in various architectural designs.

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MAGIC OF NEON SIGN MAKING SHOWN IN PICTURES (Aug, 1931)

MAGIC OF NEON SIGN MAKING SHOWN IN PICTURES

HOW NEON LIGHTS ARE MADE. The story of the strange new light, invented by Georges Claude, French engineer, told in photos.

FIRST STEP IN MAKING A NEON SIGN. An artist draws a design which includes lettering and decoration, and this design is then enlarged to desired size so tubes can be right dimensions.

SHAPING THE HOT TUBES. With the artist’s design laid upon sheet asbestos, the tubes for the neon sign are heated and then quickly laid in place upon the design and bent to fit it.

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Colored Underwater Lights Lend Magic Beauty to Garden Pools and Fountains (Jul, 1934)

Colored Underwater Lights Lend Magic Beauty to Garden Pools and Fountains

By Walter E. Burton

THE magic touch of light will transform your garden pool into a jewel that gleams in the darkness with astonishing beauty. Goldfish, plants, and other details of the submarine world that you normally do not see, become a source of endless pleasure. If there is a fountain or miniature waterfall, light will bring out its hidden beauty. A swimming pool, whether indoors or out, will be doubly serviceable if it is equipped with an underwater lighting system.

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Radio’s Warning Lights (Nov, 1931)

Radio’s Warning Lights

RADIO masts, towering hundreds of feet into the air, present dangers to the aviator like the unseen “snags” of the Mississippi to the steamboats of old days. However, with powerful illumination of the kind shown here, they become beacons to guide tlie pilot who is familiar with their positions.

The type of light shown here, with its six radiating neon tubes, is especially visible from above. Such lamps have recently been installed on the masts of the new transmitter of station KDKA, at Saxonburgh, Pennsylvania, near Pittsburgh.

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Why take chances with eyes? (Mar, 1935)

The crazy thing is you can still buy a 100-watt light bulb for about 25 cents in today’s dollars.

Why take chances with eyes?

Good light costs so little

Eyesight is priceless . . . good light is cheap. Why take unnecessary risks? You can buy a genuine 100-watt Edison Mazda lamp, the size that is so fine for reading, writing or working, for only 25 cents, and the smaller sizes, 75-watts and under, for only 20 cents. These good lamps not only help guard against eyestrain… they protect your pocketbook by using electricity economically. And they don’t burn out too soon. Why take chances? Look for this mark on every bulb you buy.

General Electric Co., Nela Park, Cleveland, O.

EDISON MAZDA LAMPS
GENERAL ELECTRIC

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Light Fixture and Vent Fan in One (Jul, 1931)

Wouldn’t this just spread the hot air from the light bulb around the room? It doesn’t seem like a particularly good way of cooling. Ceiling fans are similar, but they have a much wider fan blade and actually don’t draw from the middle.

Light Fixture and Vent Fan in One

A NEW low priced combination fan and lighting fixture for ceiling mounting, known as “Koolite,” which serves both to light and provide proper ventilation for a room, has recently been placed on the market by manufacturers. Designed for easy installation in homes and offices, the “Koolite” is compact, efficient and ruggedly built.

The semi-direct lighting of the device meets all modern requirements, and its ventilating arrangement provides for thorough, constant circulation of air in rooms of more than average size. The design diffuses the air over a large area after it leaves the blades of the fan.

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TINY BULB ILLUMINATES POLICE BADGE AT NIGHT (Nov, 1935)

TINY BULB ILLUMINATES POLICE BADGE AT NIGHT

So that railroad police assigned to yard duty may readily identify themselves after dark, an illuminated badge has been introduced. Flash-light cells mounted on the back of the badge provide current to light a small bulb when the user presses a switch as shown in the photograph above.

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