Archive
Tag "movie making"
Letters Rain Down in Movie Title (Apr, 1940)

Letters Rain Down in Movie Title

Amateur cinematographers who wish to inject a touch of originality into their home movie titles will find the following trick quite interesting. Unlike the familiar stunt of having groups of letters suddenly fly into view and arrange themselves in the form of a title, this effect is that of a quantity of letters raining past the view. At intervals certain ones affix themselves at random to the easel to spell out the title.

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Beam “Mike” for Outdoor Films (Oct, 1930)

Beam “Mike” for Outdoor Films

Revolutionary in its scope and perfected to the point where it is believed millions of dollars will be saved in the production of outdoor talking pictures, the beam microphone pictured at the left is being used for the first time in the filming of a railroad epic in Montana. The microphone will pick up sounds only from the point at which it is aimed, thus permitting directors to give oral instructions during filming.

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TRICK LENSES ADD COMEDY TO MOVIES (Aug, 1931)

TRICK LENSES ADD COMEDY TO MOVIES

In a little workshop in Los Angeles, Calif., sits a man who for your amusement distorts normal looking movie actors and actresses into freaks. He is James Herron, and he makes the lenses by which strange distorted effects are produced in some motion picture comedies.

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JON WHITCOMB Watches the Filming of the Fabulous Life of Genghis Khan (Nov, 1954)

JON WHITCOMB Watches the Filming of the Fabulous Life of Genghis Khan

Cosmopolitan’s artist-reporter tells how it feels to be part of a $6,000,000 Mongolian horde loose in Utah’s 115-degree heat.

The sun poured down out of a white sky onto the bright orange desert sand, and I could feel little rivers of sweat creep down my neck. Waves of heat bounced off the gaudy Tatar huts dotting the valley. People standing near were wearing fur hats, fur coats, and heavy leather pants.

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ARC LAMP CONCEALED IN HAND MIMICS GLOW OF MATCH (May, 1924)

ARC LAMP CONCEALED IN HAND MIMICS GLOW OF MATCH

To give a realistic effect of the flare of a match suddenly illuminating the face of a moving-picture actor, a small electric arc
light has been made that is fitted into a case hidden in the hand. Darkness screens all wires and as the hands are cupped to form a wind shield, the apparatus cannot be detected. The powerful light shed by this small arc brings out the lines and shadows of the face far more effectively than would be possible with a match.

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YOUTH, the SPIRIT of the MOVIES (Oct, 1921)

Of course David Wark Griffith is better known as D.W. Griffith, a pioneering filmmaker and director of the contraversial film The Birth of a Nation.

YOUTH, the SPIRIT of the MOVIES

By David Wark Griffith

IT is youth that wins war. And it is youth that wins audiences. Often, people inquire why movie stars are small in stature and youthful in appearance. Not all of those that are successful are so little—Constance Talmadge, for instance, is not—yet most of the movie heroines are.

Usually, they are little, and they are young. But why?

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Crashing a Zeppelin for Fun (May, 1931)

Crashing a Zeppelin for Fun

by DICK COLE

who gives you a look behind the scenes of the most spectacular air thriller ever made.

Jealously guarded secrets of the amazing Zeppelin crash in “Hell’s Angels” now revealed to Dick Cole by Howard Hughes, the producer of this spectacular movie.

“Wasn’t it marvelous! How in the world did they ever take it?”

Such exclamations and questions are heard on every side as a teeming crowd pours forth from a theater after seeing “Hell’s Angels” -—the outstanding aerial war picture of the day. And it is little wonder! For several hours the spectators have been soaring 10,000 feet above the earth in a huge, wartime Zeppelin, or they have been sky-riding in a giant bombing plane.

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Amateurs Capture ACTION for the NEWSREELS (May, 1936)

I had no idea that panning a camera used to be called panoraming. Saying: “Don’t panoram or tilt unless absolutely necessary” just sounds weird.

Amateurs Capture ACTION for the NEWSREELS

When a peaceful valley suddenly becomes the scene of a roaring flood, the amateur news cameraman is on the job. Where hurricanes rage or great explosions take their toll, the newsreels depend upon alert amateurs. This article tells how it is done.

by MAXWELL R. GRANT

PRISON sirens howl as a band of desperate convicts blaze their way out of the penitentiary with smuggled guns. Hot on their trail follows an amateur cameraman. He photographs scenes of the resulting confusion, the hurried marshalling of police cars, the armed guards pacing the prison walls, the excited crowd of curiosity seekers, and gets human-interest shots overlooked by professional news-reel men.

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MAKEUP SECRETS of Movie HORROR Pictures (Feb, 1933)

MAKEUP SECRETS of Movie HORROR Pictures

When you shudder at the sight of frightful characters in horror movies, it is usually the makeup man who is responsible for your thrills. Read here how he creates actors that terrify you.

by JAMES BOWLES

FROM the depths of an ancient casket a bony and shriveled hand stretched back across history thirty-seven centuries to snatch a scroll from a terror-stricken actress.

Deep, gray lines of age streaked the hand. Dust fell from ancient fingers. Yet it moved, actually grasped the parchment, and disappeared from the screen.

Outside the camera angle sat Boris Karloff. It was his hand whose antiquity the camera revealed, a hand “mummified” earlier in the morning by Jack Pierce, movie make-up expert, who recently produced a living mummy in the person of Karloff, complete in 1500 feet of rotted cloth bandages, wrinkled skin, closed eyes and the yellow hair of a person dead many centuries.

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The Talking Newspaper (Aug, 1930)

The Talking Newspaper

By MICHEL MOK

This vivid account of how sound and action reels are made lays bare for you the secrets of a new industry. Big trucks or planes rush camera to scene of news.

SIX o’clock of a stormy spring evening. Fire breaks out in the Ohio State Penitentiary at Columbus. Five thousand men fight for their lives behind melting prison bars. Three hundred and seventeen are killed in their cells by flames and suffocation.

Three o’clock the next afternoon. Carefree crowds fill the moving picture houses along Broadway, New York City. There, 600 miles from the scene of the holocaust, only twenty-one hours after the first alarm, Pathe News pictures of the disaster are thrown on the screens.

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