Archive
Tag "telescopes"
Blowing Distortion Out of Palomar’s Eye (Jun, 1950)

Preventing distortion in modern telescopes is a bit more complicated.

Blowing Distortion Out of Palomar’s Eye

ORDINARY electric fans—a dozen of them—plus an “overcoat” of insulating foil are helping the Big Eye of the Palomar Observatory to see clearer and farther into the vastness of the universe.

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TO SEE THE MEN ON MARS? (Feb, 1909)

There actually are few liquid mirror telescopes in operation at the moment. The biggest is the 6 meter Large Zenith Telescope.

TO SEE THE MEN ON MARS?

By LITTELL McCLUNG

PROF. ROBERT W. WOOD, of the Johns Hopkins University, has perfected an invention — based on a discovery — that may revolutionize the present costly and cumbersome methods of studying the stars and exploring the universe for new planets, suns, moons, and asteroids.

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Signals from the Stars (Jul, 1952)

Things have come a very, very long way since then. Check out the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA), currently being built in Chile. When it’s complete it will have 66 separate dishes, each over 12 meters in diameter and be powered by one of the worlds fastest supercomputers.

Signals from the Stars

EVER since it was first indicated that the static present in the output of radio receivers was due in part to physical disturbances on the sun a new field of research has attracted popular scientific interest. It is radio astronomy, whose equipment and observers listen not to man made responses, but instead to continuous “static” from the stars. That cosmic radio noise exists was realized as far back as 1931. Early records proved it to be most intense when receivers probed toward the Milky Way, or lengthwise through our enormous watch-shaped galaxy.

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Star Gazers in the Sky (Oct, 1956)

Star Gazers in the Sky

By G. Harry Stine

Vikng-Aerobee Operations Engineer White Sands Proving Ground

SOONER or later the question arises: what are we going to do when we finally get our rockets into outer space? Among the people who have answers ready are the astronomers. If you have ever built any of the telescopes featured in this magazine and then used them to look at the moon and the planets, you realize why. Through an earthbound telescope, the images swim, ripple and blur. No matter how good an observing spot you have chosen, you are always peering out through the Earth’s murky, turbulent atmosphere which distorts what you see and which also distorts the things scientific instruments such as the spectroscope see.

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The Amateur Telescope Maker’s Page (Jul, 1956)

There now some slightly bigger telescopes in the Pacific area.

The Amateur Telescope Maker’s Page

AT a cash outlay of $300, boys at a Hawaiian school built a 20-inch reflecting telescope which has been valued at $20,000. It is said to be one of the largest telescopes in the Pacific area. With the exception of the grinding of the mirror, all the work was done by the students of the Kamehameha school, a private grammar school named after Hawaii’s greatest king. The f-6 mirror was donated by a government employee who ground it himself, taking six months for the job.

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Photographs STAR Moving 4800 MILES A SECOND (May, 1930)

This article is interesting for a number of reasons. One of the most interesting is that M.L Humasen was a high-school dropout who got a job as a janitor at Mt. Wilson Observatory where the was later made a member of the astronomical staff . He went on to take many of the observation that Edwin Hubble used to formulate Hubble’s Law. It’s odd that in the interview Humasen says he doesn’t believe the universe is “blowing up” which is precisely what Hubble’s Law says, though a bit less dramatically.

I’m a little confused about calling the object a star. N.G.C 4800 is actually a galaxy. Hubble was the one who proved, in the early 1920′s that these distant objects were outside the Milky Way and were in fact galaxies. Since they also refer to it as a nebula (which was sort of a catch-all term for blurry stellar objects at the time) I’m going to guess that it was just the reporter who decided it was a star.

I don’t know enough about solar spectra to be sure, but it seems like you wouldn’t be able to make a direct comparison of the spectra from a whole galaxy to that of one star. Incidentally N.G.C 4800 is actually 97.14 million light years away not the 50 million the article states.

Photographs STAR Moving 4800 MILES A SECOND

Sitting with his eye glued to a telescopic camera for 45 hours, M. L. Humason, Mt. Wilson astronomer, has succeeded in setting a record for long distance photographs. The nebula on which he trained his camera is 50,000,000 light years away from the earth.

FOR 45 hours in total darkness, Milton L. Humason, member of the astronomical staff at the Mt. Wilson observatory at Pasadena, California, trained the world’s largest telescope toward a far distant point in the heavens and obtained a photograph of a nebula 50,000,000 light years away from the earth—a total of 300 quintillion miles.

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Signals from the Stars (Jul, 1952)

Signals from the Stars

EVER since it was first indicated that the static present in the output of radio receivers was due in part to physical disturbances on the sun a new field of research has attracted popular scientific interest. It is radio astronomy, whose equipment and observers listen not to man made responses, but instead to continuous “static” from the stars. That cosmic radio noise exists was realized as far back as 1931. Early records proved it to be most intense when receivers probed toward the Milky Way, or lengthwise through our enormous watch-shaped galaxy.

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Science Builds Greatest Telescope (Sep, 1938)

Science Builds Greatest Telescope

Monster 200-inch “eye” will reveal hitherto unknown secrets of the universe and enrich man’s knowledge of life on earth.

by John Edwin Hogg

Nine years ago Palomar Mountain was a little-known mass of rock and earth in San Diego county, California. Being only 6,129 feet high, it is a mere foothill without even the distinction of altitude in a state where scores of perpetually snow-clad peaks rise to perpendicular heights of nearly three miles. A few Californians knew it as a good place to go deer hunting. Others, well-versed in state lore, had heard of it as the home of Nigger Nate, a fugitive slave who for many years lived the life of a recluse far up on Palomar’s forested slopes.

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Palomar Telescope Won’t See Far Enough! (Mar, 1948)

It’s the Biggest… It’s the Newest… But Palomar Telescope Won’t See Far Enough!

BY LOGAN REAVIS

SOME time this year an astronomer will peer for the first time through the largest telescope the world has ever known—will penetrate space to a distance of two billion light years farther than the eye of man has ever explored.

But he won’t see far enough.

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German Telescope is UNIQUE in Design (Aug, 1930)

Sure, it’s a “telescope”.

German Telescope is UNIQUE in Design

ANEW departure in the way of design and operation of high power telescopes has been effected at the Treptow astronomical observatory, near Berlin, which is one of the best in Germany. Of a design that is distinctly unique—it might be called modernistic—the new mammoth telescope, shown in the photo at the left, has many features that add immensely to the facility of star-gazing.

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