Archive
Tag "typewriters"
Vari-Typer: Hundreds of Changeable PRINT STYLE TYPES (Dec, 1954)

Hundreds of Changeable PRINT STYLE TYPES

Produce your own type for forms, direct-mail literature, catalogs, booklets, etc., in a variety of attractive type styles, all by your office typist.

FOR ANY PROCESS
• DIRECT-TO-PLATE
• PHOTO-OFFSET
• DRAFTING
• STENCIL

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ROYAL AGAIN ADVANCES THE STANDARDS OF BEAUTY AND PERFECTION (Mar, 1930)

ROYAL AGAIN ADVANCES THE STANDARDS OF BEAUTY AND PERFECTION

The New ROYAL TYPEWRITER Portable

Here is the culminating achievement in home-sized typewriters! The new Royal Portable! Refined in design with many advanced convenience features added. Simpler. Handier. Decidedly easier to operate. Sturdier. More compact. Subtly blended Duotone colorings further enhance its charm.

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Children Learn to Run Typewriter in First Grade / Ski Jump (May, 1929)

I think my school started letting us learn to type on computers around the third grade. But that was around 1984 and we were using Commodore 64s. I presume it happens earlier, if not at home. That was also the year I got my first home computer, an Apple IIc.

Children Learn to Run Typewriter in First Grade

NEW YORK school authorities are experimenting with a new phase of elementary instruction in the Horace Mann school, New York City. Children of the first grade receive typing lessons as a part of the regular school curriculum.

It is the theory of educators who are performing the experiment that such instruction, while children are beginning to learn the alphabet, will be exceedingly easy for them to master.

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EARN BIG PAY IN AN EXCITING CAREER – Stenotype Operator (Nov, 1965)

EARN BIG PAY IN AN EXCITING CAREER!

Put yourself in the center of important events. Learn at home to become a

Stenotype (MACHINE SHORTHAND) Operator

Easy to learn even if you’ve never taken shorthand before!

Step up from routine office work into a glamour job where the pay is far above the average. Sit beside top corporation executives at board meetings and big conferences. Even cover conventions and courtroom trials!

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NEW IN SCIENCE (May, 1950)

NEW IN SCIENCE

High Soarer: the Switchette in the right hand of Mrs. Dolores Mohlmann reached an altitude of 250 miles—higher than any other man-made article. It was attached to a two-stage rocket (model in left hand) and was used to discharge a smaller rocket at an altitude of 20 miles. Portion of tail section with this gadget was found at White Sands.

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More Christmas Suggestions (Dec, 1936)

Apparently typewriters were the must-have gift that season. They make up three out of 13 suggestions.

More Christmas Suggestions

For the junior scientist what would be more appropriate than this photo electric eye apparatus. Motors can be made to run by waving your arm, burglar alarms installed without wiring and music can be produced from varying light beams.

Any member of the family will appreciate a flashlight. This model features a chrome case and a positive contact thumb switch.

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Christmas Suggestions (Dec, 1936)

Also take a look at More Christmas Suggestions from the same issue.

Christmas Suggestions

For the amateur scientist this Micro-photography outfit is the ideal gift. Permanent records of all experiments can be kept on photographic prints. The microscope and the camera can be used independently.

Cellulose wrappings add much to the appearance of gifts. At right are examples of what attractive wrapping will do. Below—This toy airplane will thrill any youth who receives it. Plane performs like a real ship.

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Speed Indicator to Aid Typist (Jan, 1930)

Speed Indicator to Aid Typist

A WORD tabulator has been devised for attachment to typewriters to assist operators in watching the speed with which they are typing. Ella Freer, school novice typing champion of New York state, is shown below using a wood tabulator attached to her machine as she practiced for the international typewriting contest at Toronto.

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Remote Keyboard (Mar, 1947)

Remote Keyboard of this electromatic typewriter makes it possible for disabled, bed-ridden patients to type their own letters while lying in almost any position. This veteran, Russell A. Ludden, a patient at the Bronx Veterans Hospital, is shown being given a typing lesson by Miss Margaret Dale, instructor of commercial subjects,

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TYPEWRITER REPLACES TYPESETTER IN NEW METHOD OF COMPOSITION (Jul, 1934)

TYPEWRITER REPLACES TYPESETTER IN NEW METHOD OF COMPOSITION

PROMISING a new departure in the methods of printing books, newspapers, and periodicals, a recent invention enables any typist to produce perfectly aligned columns of copy with an ordinary typewriter, since it corrects the usual irregularity of the right-hand margin. The resulting copy may be reproduced by standard photo lithographic methods, eliminating the need for present-day typesetting, matrix, and stereotype equipment. A sample of the new typewriter printing is shown in the center illustration above.

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